and sometimes poetry

Certified Copy (2011) | Review by Mark Leidner

What a gift life is. What a gentle wind it is. What a strange radiation it gives off. What a feat of engineering it is. What a cypress it is. What a lovely, ruffled farce it is. What frigid heat it has. What faces. What invisible languages. How slowly fast. How it rolls over every morning. How it offices. How it houses. How much like a branch anchored to the molecules of air by its leaves it behaves. How little like itself it sounds. How steep its walls. What fights its boats put up against its awesome squalls. How beautiful are the consonant masts and the vowelled sails. What a mess it is. What teeth it has. What sleek sleep it seeks. The bizarre and pointless gardens it extends and tends. What rains are nourished in reverse by its great versed vegetables. What weird, coiled weeds. What cheap cameras and expensive expertises.  What belltowers it raises like flowers of sound to the eary sky. How sad it is it has to die. What finality. What a face. What a can of dreams. What a cavern of a movie. Echoing happiness. All good art begins pretending to be about art and ends up being about love.

What an actress Juliette Binoche is. What ample, living gnocchi. What intimacy Abbas Kiarostami knits with his direction. What forgotten nuances of human love nest just around the corner in the novel placement of a camera. A placement that articulates not only the point of view of the character on the screen, but of the unseen character’s perception of the psychology of the seen, tiptoeing up a twizzled stairway, stomping out of a church. What sweet originality burgeons in the careful observation of the fringes of an omnipotent genre. Who let the dogs of a dialogue about art and perception twist into a bleakly beautiful duet about love out? Kiarostrami’s magnanimous eye. How lovely realism is. How honeycombed and bee-protected are its sticky mysteries. How forever I want to live. Film! Bright dungeon! Spring! Drown me in your ocean of Binochean dreams. If I were a quiet, green hill barely visible in the distance from the balcony of her Italian villa, from which she sipped a cappuccino and stared out at the sun painting the morning, and her brown eyes briefly fell on me, I would be weightless in their grace.

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3 responses

  1. i’m a-watch this again and look out for th gnocchi

    –mza.

    April 12, 2011 at 3:14 pm

    • mark leidner

      ate gnocchi for the first time two nights after seeing this — learning the noun ‘gnocchi’ from a dinner companion as i chewed it — and it was so delicious and new in food and word that when i tried to think of how much i love juliette binoche i burped a little bit back up

      April 12, 2011 at 5:18 pm

      • haha I’m a gnocchi fan — I like how you can eat just a little of it and you’re full, but I sense that I could consume a lot of Binoche and keep going back for more …… This week’s new food word for me was roux, but it turns out that’s just something you have to make in order to make mac’n’cheese. This post was damn good eatin’, too, Mark

        –mza.

        April 12, 2011 at 10:46 pm

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