and sometimes poetry

Thor (2011) | Review by Mark Leidner

Thor is pure shit.

Imagine a person vomiting uncontrollably—not out of the mouth—but out of the anus. Color this blast of hot disjecta the brightest and cheesiest tints of CGI you can think of, and that is the feeling of Thor.

Thor‘s actors perform line readings like mass-media sculpted poodles painfully coughing up used condoms.

Through curly straws, Thor’s screenwriters sip cups of their own foetid feces, then spit it back into the cup of the movie, slide the cup across the table to you, which you drink without straw, so excrement cakes around your mouth until you resemble some kind of horrible clown.

Exiting Lascaux Picasso said, “In 12,000 years, we have learned nothing.”

Having attended the midnight opening, exiting Cinemark at a grim 2 a.m., I said to Hannah, “In 12 years we have learned nothing.”

Referring to 1999’s Phantom Menace, wherein millions of dollars pumped into empty CGI dreamscapes so enmired a narrative in visual camp that no emotional investment in a single character or event was possible.

Why is the Death Star of the immortal Norsemen a giant, fire-breathing, Soviet realism robot?

Why is there an Asian sidekick in the immortal Norsemen’s posse of stupid friends?

Of course the golden-mailed guardian of the Stargate of the Immortal Norsemen is a blind, black oracle who randomly melts out of the cocoon of ice in which Loki froze him at the very moment Thor needs rescuing—why not? Also, of course Anthony Hopkins’ Odin isn’t really dead but wakes up at the last second to shed a tear and live forever.

Of course the racial nemeses of the Norse are red-eyed blue goblins who do nothing all day on their iceball of a planet but stand around like refugees in ice caves, thinking about ice, making weapons of ice, planning al-Qaeda-style ice-hjinx.

I normally try very hard not to be a typically homophobic white male sexist pig; but Thor so thoroughly offended every  fiber of my entertainable being that I had no way to address it without recourse to the  homophobic epithets of childhood, turning to Hannah halfway through, “This movie is straight-up gay.” I am ashamed of that moment but report it in the spirit of full disclosure.

Loki—okay—Thor’s obvious neme-sissy—has an interesting character torn internally by dueling loyalties, each of which resonated royally with me; which is to say the villain, like good ones should be, is kind of right, he just takes it too far and gets his soul-wings clipped in the scissors of destiny.

Pods of greasy and pathetic nerds undulated with big-tittied laughter in the theater Hannah and I saw this bullshit in, wheezing hardest at moments of greatest homoerotic misogyny. Thor is like a thin trampoline upon which a Boy Scout troop’s worth of American nerds aren’t even jumping, just standing in a circle with their pants at their ankles, masturbating in patriotic, stroke-for-stroke unison.

I was a nerd too—but old school. The shame of a flowering sensitivity and brindling wit was what alienated me from my barbarian milieu—but today’s nerd is dumber, fatter, lazier, and duller than I ever was. Their only curse a blubbery sense of entitlement and wild overestimation of their own worth—like a moss that covers their souls—forever retarding growth.

Thor is proof of the nerd’s refusal to think about or attempt to articulate his plight; instead retreating fully into the gaudy treads of the wheel of the monster truck of comestible stupidity, currently brightwashed in icons of a once subversive  form—comics.

Thor isn’t story—but porn—for these people.

Thor is thoroughly horrible; boredom on steroids.

If Thor were real, he would swoop down from Valhalla on a brilliant thingy of light and individually sledgehammer everyone who had not seen this movie, to prevent them from ever seeing it, out of Nordic mercy.

I’m not a woman, but if I was, trying to enjoy Thor would be like trying to enjoy a warlock engaging my vagina with the lowest branch snapped off the nearest pine tree.

If there was something good about Thor, trying to remember it is like trying to remember the eye color of someone who killed your family.

In Thor we see the triumph of the dickless, of the thoughtless, of the hopeless masculinity—a bowl of vanilla ice cream left in the sun, melted, gone rancid, devoured by flies now trying to escape up the sides of the bowl, too bloated to fly—that with bright, loud explosions blinds itself to its own self-hatred, precipitating the recapitulation of that hatred outward onto the world, imperiling everything the real Thor stood for.

Thor lurches its way down the theatrical pipe like a multi-colored, irregular turd into the twin toilet bowls of your eyes.

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8 responses

  1. Pingback: The Oxonian Review » Weekly Round-up

  2. Collin

    “I was a nerd too—but old school. The shame of a flowering sensitivity and brindling wit was what alienated me from my barbarian milieu….”

    Why do you sound like a creepy goth girl poem?

    “In Thor we see the triumph of the dickless, of the thoughtless, of the hopeless masculinity—a bowl of vanilla ice cream left in the sun, melted, gone rancid, devoured by flies now trying to escape up the sides of the bowl, too bloated to fly—that with bright, loud explosions blinds itself to its own self-hatred, precipitating the recapitulation of that hatred outward onto the world, imperiling everything the real Thor stood for.”

    I’m guessing you didn’t play much football in high school? Nursing some old grudges against masculine men who still intimidate you?

    May 16, 2011 at 3:31 am

    • mark leidner

      with the creepy goth girl poem part, i was just trying to parody the creepy goth girl style w/my diction & syntax, mostly b/c i hate goths and i generally try to make fun of them in every review

      your second question is a little more complicated – do you mean american football like w/shoulder pads and helmets? b/c some of my fans are european, but when they ask me about football experience they’re referring to soccer…

      May 16, 2011 at 3:38 am

  3. Polly D.

    Seriously? I wasn’t even a fan of the movie, but your line “I was a nerd too—but old school”…I mean, did you read Transmetropolitan three times and think that gave you old-school street cred?

    Comics aren’t all “subversive forms”. There was, and is, a lot of gaudy tits-and-ass/random action for action’s sake going on there.

    May 20, 2011 at 2:01 pm

    • mark leidner

      good call, polly – never read transmetropolitan so obviously have no cred other than my own otherwise unsupported claim of authenticity – you should review movie reviews

      also i didn’t know there was so much pointless eye candy in comics because i don’t read them, just go see their movies – though i still have this naively hopeful idea that at some point in history they carried some kernel of truth or nugget of socio-narrative relevancé

      May 20, 2011 at 2:49 pm

  4. Polly D.

    It’s okay to have that naive idea! As I writhe around in my highly entitled greasy pod I secretly and naively pray… Oh, woe, whenever will a sensitive poet come and see the real pathetic, moss-covered me? More importantly, will he understand what vomiting out of an anus feels like?

    Or, you know, I went to a movie after rubbing myself in popcorn butter and attempted to laugh at something so borderline mediocre to make myself feel better about spending $15. But I was greasy because of the popcorn butter, promise. I would have donned thicker-rimmed glasses ironically had I known there were secret poets in the audience.

    May 20, 2011 at 3:48 pm

  5. Sarah

    I’m sorry. But I don’t recall seeing anything in that movie that would make homophobics cringe. Could you articulate?

    May 26, 2011 at 7:47 pm

    • mark leidner

      sorry sarah, i don’t understand your question, nor at this point do i remember anything about the movie. all i can say in the way of explanation is that sometimes these reviews are written to be as technically inaccurate as possible in order to achieve an emotional accuracy that feels unexpected

      May 30, 2011 at 12:43 pm

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